Material Safety Data Sheet User's Guide​

13. Regulations

WHMIS ROHS
Disclosure list TDG

WHMIS - Workplace Hazardous Materials Information system

In Québec, the CSST is responsible for applying WHMIS according to the Regulation respecting information on controlled products (Québec regulation), the Controlled Products Regulations (federal regulation) and the Hazardous Products Act.

WHMIS divides hazardous materials into six main classes. These classes are based on the hazard criteria listed in the Controlled Products Regulations. A controlled product is a substance that meets one or more classification criteria. This classification can be based on the data inherent in the material or data on its ingredients.

Classes

A: Compressed gas
B1: Flammable gases
B2: Flammable liquids
B3: Combustible liquids
B4: Flammable solids
B5: Flammable aerosols
B6: Reactive flammable materials
C: Oxidizing material
D1A: Very toxic material causing immediate and serious effects
D1B: Toxic material causing immediate and serious effects
D2A: Very toxic material causing other effects
D2B: Toxic material causing other effects
D3: Biohazardous infectious material
E: Corrosive material
F : Dangerously reactive material

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Disclosure list

This list specifies whether a substance is or is not on the disclosure list of regulated ingredients according to the Hazardous Products Act and the cut-off concentration at or above which it must be disclosed (namely 0.1% or 1.0%).

Example

Ammonia must be disclosed if its concentration in a mixture is equal to or greater than 1.0% (W/W).

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Regulation respecting occupational health and safety (ROHS)

In Québec, the permissible exposure values for air contaminants are those prescribed by the Regulation respecting occupational health and safety (S2.1, R.19), extracts of which are presented below.

The time-weighted average exposure value (TWAEV) "is the time-weighted average concentration for an 8-hour workday and a 40-hour workweek of a chemical substance (in the form of gases, dusts, fumes, vapours or mists) present in the air in a worker's respiratory zone."

"For any work period equal to or longer than 4 hours but less than 8 hours or a period in excess of 8 hours but less than or equal to 16 hours, an adjusted average exposure value (AAEV) must be established in accordance with the Guide to the adjustment of permissible exposure values for unusual work schedules, published by the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (www.irsst.qc.ca), as it reads at the time it is applied. Under no circumstance may the AAEV be higher than the TWAEV."

The short-term exposure value (STEV) "is the 15-minute time-weighted average concentration for exposure to a chemical substance (in the form of gases, dusts, fumes, vapours or mists), present in the air in a worker's respiratory zone which should not be exceeded at any time during a workday, even if the time-weighted average exposure value is not exceeded. The average exposure for a 15-minute consecutive period may be included between the TWAEV and the STEV, insofar as such exposures are not repeated more than 4 times a day and have intervals between them of periods of at least 60 minutes."

The ceiling value "is the concentration never to be exceeded during any length of time whatsoever."

The regulation also includes designations and remarks: Pc (percutaneous), EM (exposure reduced to a minimum), RP (recirculation prohibited), S (sensitization) and the carcinogen designations.

For more details, consult Schedule 1 of the Regulation respecting occupational health and safety.

 

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TDG - Transportation of Dangerous Substances Regulation

In Québec, the TDG is regulated by the Transportation of Dangerous Substances Regulation of the ministère des Transports of Québec. It was adopted in compliance with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations of Transport Canada, in application of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act.

Définitions

PIN (UN): Product Identification Number. Numeric or alphanumeric designation used to identify a substance or a group of substances with the same name as dangerous goods in the regulation.

Class: numeric data used to designate a substance according to the characteristics of the hazard. In the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, products are divided into nine classes. A substance can be assigned more than one class, with the primary class (describing the main hazard) and the subsidiary class or classes also indicated.

Packing group/risk group: designation in roman numerals used to indicate the packing group or the risk group to which a dangerous good belongs.

Special provisions: numeric designation used to define the specific measures related to handling, the offering for transport or the transportation of dangerous goods.

Explosive limit and limited quantity index: number indicating the maximum amount of the hazardous good that may be handled or transported, or whose transport can be requested.

ERAP index: number indicating the maximum amounts related to ERAP (Emergency Response Assistance Plans), beyond which the dangerous goods are subject to the provisions of ERAP.

Passenger-carrying ship index: number indicating "the maximum quantity of dangerous goods per consignment that can be carried in a passenger carrying ship".

Passenger-carrying road vehicle or passengercarrying railway vehicle index: number indicating "the maximum quantity of dangerous goods that can be transported per consignment on a passenger-carrying road vehicle or a passenger carrying railway vehicle".

Marine pollutant: indicates whether the dangerous goods are marine pollutants.