WHMIS (Allyl glycidyl ether)

Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System

WHMIS 1988 classification - Note to reader
Update: 1993-03-20
  • WHMIS pictogram : Flame

    B3

  • WHMIS pictogram : Skull and crossbones

    D1A, D2B

B3
  • Combustible liquid
  • flash point = 57.22 °C closed cup (non reported method)
D1A
  • Very Toxic Material Causing Immediate and Serious Toxic Effects
D2B
  • Toxic Material Causing Other Toxic Effects

Disclosure at 0,1% according to the Ingredient disclosure list

WHMIS 2015 classification - Note to reader
Update: 2015-09-17

  • Flammable liquids - Category 31
    • Flash point = 57 °C closed cup (non reported method)
  • Acute toxicity - oral - Category 42 3 4
  • Acute toxicity - inhalation - Category 42 3 4
  • Serious eye damage/eye irritation - Category 22 3 4 5
  • Skin sensitization - Category 1B2 6 7 8 9
  • Specific target organ toxicity - single exposure (respiratory tract irritation) - Category 3 - Respiratory tract irritation2 4 10
  • Specific target organ toxicity - repeated exposure - Category 12 10

  • GHS pictogram : Flame

  • GHS pictogram : Exclamation mark

  • GHS pictogram : Health hazard

Danger

Flammable liquid and vapour (H226)
Harmful if swallowed (H302)
Harmful if inhaled (H332)
Causes serious eye irritation (H319)
May cause allergic skin reaction (H317)
May cause respiratory irritation (H335)
Causes damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure (H372)

Ingredient disclosure

References

  • ▲1.  National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NIOSH pocket guide to chemical hazards. Washington, D.C. : U.S. G.P.O. (1994). [RM-514001]
  • ▲2.  American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, Documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices / Documentation of TLV's and BEI's. 7th ed. Cincinnati, Ohio : ACGIH. (2001-). Publication #0100Doc. [RM-514008]   http://www.acgih.org
  • ▲3.  National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, RTECS (Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances). Hamilton (Ont) : Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety.   http://ccinfoweb.ccohs.ca/rtecs/search.html
  • ▲4.  Hine, C.H. et al., «The toxicology of glycidol and some glycidyl ethers.» Archives of Industrial Health. Vol. 14, p. 250-264. (1956). [AP-021583]
  • ▲5.  Centre canadien d'hygiène et de sécurité au travail, CHEMINFO, Hamilton, Ont. : Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety   http://ccinfoweb.ccohs.ca/cheminfo/search.html
  • ▲6.  Fregert, S. et Rorsman, H., «Allergens in epoxy resins.» Acta Allergologica. Vol. 19, p. 296-299. (1964). [AP-024597]
  • ▲7.  Jolanki, R. et al., «Occupational dermatoses from epoxy resin compounds.» Contact Dermatitis. Vol. 23, no. 3, p. 172-183. (1990). [AP-031278]
  • ▲8.  Angelini, G. et al., «Occupational sensitization to epoxy resin and reactive diluents in marble workers.» Contact Dermatitis. Vol. 35, no. 1, p. 11-16. (1996). [A-061958]
  • ▲9.  Dooms-Goossens, A. et al., «Contact allergy to allyl glycidyl ether present as an impurity in 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, a fixing additive in silicone and polyurethane resins.» Contact Dermatitis. Vol. 33, p. 17-19. (1995). [AP-058261]
  • ▲10.  Report on Carcinogens, 14th edition. Research Triangle Park, NC : U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Toxicology Program. (2016).   https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/pubhealth/roc/index-1.html

The [number] refers to the ISST database of the CSST Documentation Center.